Wednesday, July 26, 2006

Quilt Bookshelf

My little Lily cat is going nuts at the moment, squeaking at a bright light reflected up on the ceiling and scratching at the wall. Luckily she isn't leaping up or I think she'd bring a big picture down on her head.

Cats were strange last night. Woke up at five this morning with Bibi crashing around on the top of the bureau and Howler howling. And howling. Had both the little cats sleeping with me (Pokey rarely does that). Hadn't done anything threatening to explain it, no moving of cat carriers. Sigh.

Joyce asked me about my bookshelves a few days back and in particular my quilt books. These are some of them. I've kind of run out of room and books that I'm (re)reading aren't here, nor are the ones that I left in storage (I'm getting those out for the next post, darn it. I miss having them).

Those are handmade (not by me) wire camels on the top shelf.

I have made great progess stacking up piles of paper for shredding, sending broken stuff down the trash chute, and putting unused/unneeded items into the charity donation pile (currently out of control, but nothing I can do about that until my friend who takes care of that is back in town). I finally bit the bullet and gave up my Trivial Pursuit games. Since my hubby hates it and we haven't played in something like 5 years, it was time. Kept my Simpson's version of UNO even tho he won't play that either and Upwords, a fabulous word game that he will play when my Mom is in town - it's more fun with three people.

And why do I have all these cards and stationary? Do I really think I am going to start writing real letters again? So I gave up some of those to the giveaway pile, probably not as much as I realistically should have.

I just finished reading Julie Powell's book Julie & Julia: 365 days, 524 recipes, 1 tiny apartment kitchen. Have to say I enjoyed the hell out of it. She decided several years ago to cook her way through Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. And to do it in one year and blog about it. The book is a little self-absorbed sometimes and not for the easily offended, but I loved reading about her trying to cook all sorts of vile French dishes that I would never eat in a million years.

It helps that I have a great fondness for Julia Child. My Mom (number one Mom) watched it all the time on PBS so I grew up with it. Turns out my hubby is a fan and so we've watched Julia's more recent series and visited her kitchen at the Smithsonian as well.

Anyway, both Julie and Julia's stories are about women trying to find their way and figure out what they really want to be in life. Julia didn't discover cooking until she was in her mid-thirties living in France, and Julie found joy in writing as a thirtysomething, helped out enormously by her blog. I understand about that because I've discovered, through blogging, how much I enjoy writing tutorials and encouraging others in loosening up with their quilting. I've found what I want to do.

[I already knew I liked writing, but didn't have the proper format for it. I'm terrible at fiction. Describe the tree. It's uh, a tree. And it has green leaves. Not good with the adjectives.]

Not all that off-topic, I don't speak French (just English with a really bad, snotty, Monty Pythonesque French accent). I did some work with learning the language on the computer after Christmas, but gave up in frustration with the accent. I'll get back to it. I think I'll end up being able to read it but speak or comprehend someone speaking to me? Aiyee. The discs will be going back with us to the states. Something to work on while we're temporarily housed.

Mrs Moody offered to send me some canopic jars. Very sweet, but trust me, I got plenty around here. Sell them at the garage sale and hopefully someone there who doesn't have ready access will be thrilled to get them.

Yes, I know I should be thrilled that an American won the Tour de France, and I give Floyd Landis much credit for courage and ability, but I was hoping maybe team CSC could do it, since they're my second favorite after Discovery Channel. Though I may have to revise that in light of DC's pitiful performance.

I'm off to sew - making great progress. Later.

15 comments:

anne bebbington said...

Tonya - believe me your French will improve once you get to Paris - it will have to! The French, bless 'em have an arrogance that everyone else should speak French at all times (yeah I know we Brits are THE most guilty of not learning other languages) after all M. Chirac stormed out of a meeting only the other month in the EEC because someone decreed it would be spoken in English ! It may be different in the capital as by definition it will be full of foreigners, capitals always are, but be prepared for all civil servants and probably most shopkeepers to expect you to comply - you'll be fine, you'll just have to ride out the steep learning curve :o) I'm not the linguist in our family, far from it being a maths and art bod but I coped in a little provincial village where virtually no-one would admit to knowing any other language - one of the most useful phrases is 'plus lentement s.v.p.' more slowly please (wry smile) Joking apart I still envy you the chance of living there even after our experiences

Kathie said...

Are you going to be living in Paris? I thought I read something about Maryland...

Judy said...

I was reading Anne's comment first and had to laugh when she said the French expect everyone to speak french...so do American's. We always expect people to learn English. It will come after a while, especially when you are emersed in the language over there. My suggestion is to find a college French book. Wish I still had mine or I would send them to you!

Love the rack of books, I have about that same size pile, luckily with none in storage...but I have to be careful or I'd own them all!

EileenKNY said...

Took 2 years of French in HS, and the sister who taught it asked me to please take Spanish. lol
You'll do fine, I'm sure. Yes, the French want everyone to speak it, but from what I understand, most countries teach English as a second language starting in elementary school. So they'll understand you, even if you don't understand them at first.

Dawn said...

OK, the first thing I spotted were those wire camels! Now those are just too cute! You have got to have the funnest house to browse around in! Mine is just so blah!

quiltpixie said...

love the camels! You have so many intersting collectables...

Finn said...

Morning Ton, sorry to hear of the midnight hours disturbance of the felines tranquil slumber.

What what is afoot in the Universe. Moon phase?
I have no doubt that their vibrational frequency is superior to ours. Always makes me wonder when they get those "wild" streak and tear around like the Devil was after them.

Fun to see your book shelves..but what a tease..even with my magnifying glass I can only make out some of the titles..LOL.

I'm looking forward to seeing your webpage..*VBS* Hugs, Finn

Mary said...

I loved the book Julie & Julie too. My son just finished culinary school and I enjoyed reading about some of the same type of culinary things he'd described doing. We'd also visited Julie's kitchen at the Smithsonian last summer.

I had just ignored the whole blogging thing until I'd read this book. Afterwards when I had the opportunity to join the Stash Quilts blog ring, I jumped in and have really enjoyed it.

Laura said...

I can't imagine having to learn a new language at this point in my life. I don't think I would have the energy to do it. I am going to check out the book, it sounds like fun. You know I don't cook, can't cook but I love to read about people who do (weird, hey). I loved the Frances Mayes books.

YankeeQuilter said...

I've always loved Juilia Childs...not that I've ever used her recipies but just love watching her! Sounds like the move is moving along! I wish I had thrown out/donated more than I did...another lesson learned!
Siobhan

Sewcatherine said...

I want to read that book...but right now I am actually trying to read actual cook book, Art of French Cooking. I found it at antique shop a few weeks ago for $5, so I thought what the heck. I still reading the first chapter...just definitions.

Nines said...

Making fantastic progress with sewing? Now, I'm a tad bit envious. Sigh. Well, maybe I'll catch up some day! Hope the kitties have settled down, but I must admit that ours have been like that also. Can't decide if it's cute or really annoying...

Ama said...

In Canada they start with French as a second language in Kindegarden, grade 4 or high school depending on your school board. Due to cosmic interference and my dad's job transfers I took the same 5 years of French three times. Which means I know the colours and days of the week exteremly well but past that - not so much.

I live in a predominently french community and am considered the only true anglo so the folks at the post office and lumber yard take pity on me and talk.....real.... slow..... then get fed up with my attempts to decipher and switch to english. I am told my "translating" face looks exactly like a deer caught in the car head lights. I am pretending that is said in an endearing way.

I want to get the Julie and Julia book even more now, I read Julia's autobiography and was fasinated by her life. She is truely an inspiration.

ForestJane said...

Question:

How do the women who cover up all except their eyes manage eating out in a restaurant? Do they cover the plate with the lower half and kind of pull their hands underneath? Or do they just not eat out in public?

Or is inside a restaurant considered indoors and they're permitted to uncover?

Coll said...

Read Julia and Julia last week and throughly enjoyed it both to see into the life of a current day 30-something and because of the Julia Child connection and fabulous recipes. (All that butter! Yum) Glad you enjoyed it! I always wondered what my cats could see when they went zingo and ran madly around the room. Aliens,angels or really little earthquakes, maybe. How is the conflict changing your life?